Saturday, September 26, 2009

China Girl 12 - Zhujiajiao


Let's go back to China. This time
we will get out of the big cities and go to a small town about 45 minutes out of Shanghai to a
town called Zhujiajiao. It is one of many water towns. These old
relic towns were built on waterways as a means of transportation. We wanted to see a real Chinese town, that wasn’t the hustle and bustle of the big city. We were not disappointed. Our guide was a friend of Susie’s who has been in China for several years and hails from Australia and her name is Larissa. She has already visited Zhujiajiao on a couple different occasions and knew the ropes.

Zhujiajiao is more than 1700 years old. There are more than 30 old bridges, all of them different in construction and looks.
The streets are so narrow that a vehicle can’t fit. In most cases the house is on a road on one side and the river on the other side; kinda like a Chinese Venice, only not really.

Here, people are bathing,

washing clothes and dumping garbage in this river. I can’t recall any of that in Italy.

We toured around this quaint little village and saw life much different that the everyday Chinese life that the average tourist get’s to see. They do have the prerequisite shops that try to draw you in to purchase fans, and umbrellas, and trinkets of all types. They have clothing and silk comforters, and antiques and food; always the local food. The smells take some getting used to. It is completely different than what I perceive as Chinese food smells. I think of soy and a sweet ginger smell. That is not what I smell here. I can’t even describe it because I don’t know what makes up the local cuisine. Let’s just say, I’m not crazy about the odor.

Jayne was always saying, 'this time you get in the picture' and this is one of those times. This is me and Susie and our Aussie tour guide Larissa.

There are small museums, and pottery remains as well as a summer palace from the Qing Dynasty and many temples and gardens. I love these little boats.

Here's what I called a place where Batman could live and sure enough around the bend was
Pavilion.
These are just some pictures that I like from the place. We took a gondola ride down the not so clean river.
This type of architecture is not to be found in any place I saw in Shanghai.
When I think of China this kind of building is what my mind conjures up.

You can see the whole town in a few hours and it really isn’t a place where you stay a couple days. There are no places to spend the night anyway and the town closes up like a ghost town at night.

They do have the prerequisite shops that try to draw you in to purchase fans, and umbrellas, and trinkets of all types. They have clothing and silk comforters, and antiques and food; always the local food. The smells take some getting used to. It is completely different than what I perceive as Chinese food smells. I think of soy and a sweet ginger smell. That is not what I smell here. I can’t even describe it because I don’t know what makes up the local cuisine. Let’s just say, I’m not crazy about the odor.

Although there are many many restaurants on the river, they do not cater to Western cuisine so we had our visit and then headed out of town for a lovely club sandwich at a English speaking hotel. The heat was almost unbearable. I don’t know what the temp was but we were soaking wet from head to toe most of the day. In the beginning it feels very uncomfortable but you actually get a little used to it after awhile; it’s a good thing, because it is sweltering hot each day I was there.
And I just liked this shot of the young girls.

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